Saturday, June 24, 2017

Extraordinary Discourse 335


Prophet Margins









My favorite thing is to have a big dinner with friends and talk about life.
Carla Gugino









Saturday, June 17, 2017

Extraordinary Discourse 334


Back Talk And Side Talk






I talk about the gods, I am an atheist. But I am an artist too, and therefore a liar. Distrust everything I say. I am telling the truth.
Ursula K. Le Guin








Saturday, June 10, 2017

Extraordinary Discourse 333


Talk It Through






Propositions, sentences, sentence-tokens, statements, concepts, beliefs, thoughts, intuitions, utterances, judgments, declarations, explanations, questions.







Saturday, June 3, 2017

Extraordinary Discourse 332


Excerptional Excepts






Many native traditions held clowns and tricksters as essential to any contact with the sacred. People could not pray until they had laughed, because laughter opens and frees from rigid preconception. Humans had to have tricksters within the most sacred ceremonies for fear that they forget the sacred comes through upset, reversal, surprise. The trickster in most native traditions is essential to creation, to birth.
Byrd Gibbens












Saturday, May 27, 2017

Extraordinary Discourse 331


F Your "Curriculum"






…art was perhaps this—the psychological component of the autoimmune system. It works on the artist as a healing. But it works on others too, as a medicine. Hence our great, insatiable thirst for it. However it comes out—whether a design in a carpet, a painting on a wall, the shaping of a doorway—we recognize that medicinal element because of the instant healing effect, and we call it art. It consoles and heals something in us. That’s why that aspect of things is so important, and why what we want to preserve in civilizations and societies is their art—because it’s a living medicine that we can still use. It still works. We feel it working. Prose, narratives, etcetera, can carry this healing. Poetry does it more intensely. Music, maybe, most intensely of all.
Ted Hughes, The Art of Poetry No. 71
Paris Review